Farming 101

 

And so the rest of my farming education began, this time with something a little more active than a butternut. Feeling like Mr.s Tweeny from chicken run – minus the chicken pies (these chickens are laying fertile eggs) I put on my new overalls and prepped for a day of catching birds. 2000 chickens were relocated to their new home 3 hours away. All I can say is, the vegetables may benefit from chicken manure but my face and arms definitely did not,  if you ever want a machine that flings manure at a rapid rate please invest in this winged delight. 5 hours of running after pretty nimble birds, caused for a well needed early night. The following week was spent, less smelly as we hauled feed around the farm and snacked on some much-needed doughnuts. I’ve learnt while vegetables might be a little more pleasant, I definitely have love for these feathery friends and will be investing in pet ones for my future farm home.

It’s what you do with them!

I’ve spent the last few days running around collecting more tyres for my playgrounds. If you haven’t heard there’s a group called playground ideas (https://playgroundideas.org)

this organisation raises funds to build schools in rural areas. They use recycled materials and can do wonders with a tyre! Thankfully for me they load videos and instructions on how to build and give you great ideas.

Ive got a busy week in town meeting NGOs and talking all things conservation and sustainability with as many people as I can, until I head back to the bush and put my hard hat on!

I know there’s a lot of ideas out there and Pinterest is marvellous, but any upcycled ideas for children’s play or tips on how to use a screwdriver are always welcome!

 

 

Save our bees!

Last week with tools in hand, me, Ticky and Di went out to place the 10 boxes we have received. In hope to find roaming bachelors wanting a new pad. Having no miniature estate agent to call it was up to us to think like a bee. We scrambled up rocks and climbed up trees hunting for the best locations. The boxes had to face north, which had me wondering If they weren’t perfect north would the bee shout to his friend ‘bad landing here Jeff let’s see what else is on the market.’  After finding their home, most boxes had to be secured by bits of broken wood and rope then finally covered with ash so the ants wouldn’t find the prime retail first. Luckily, we didn’t have to DIY on them all they ranged from having a veranda to simply being placed on top of a rock. As well as being excited about the on-tap honey, bee populations are rapidly decreasing. And simply, without them the world as we know it wouldn’t exist. Bees pollinate a third of our foods, and the smallest of creatures can cause the biggest of ripples. Men estimated 7years of life without them. So, while we go about our day, thinking we are on the top of the ladder, purchase that honey. Be grateful and aware that were not so big, were simply a part of a huge web and we owe so much to those fuzzy black and yellow’s flying around our gardens.

Brick slaying..

I’ve been spending some time with Oliver For some pre practice, before I start the main thing. Helping build a bathroom in my aunties house. Personally all I really wanted was the tool belt but apparently that has to be earnt.  Like a black belt in karate. The day ended in wonky bricks and more motor on myself then where it was meant to be but hay practice makes perfect!!